INTER-SPECIES.

Within chimpanzee communities, individuals are very tolerant of each other with fighting or aggression rarely seen to be intense enough to cause death of a community member. It is important for communities to have strong social bonds with each other to ensure their welfare. However, such hospitality does not usually extend to neighboring communities. Chimpanzees are very territorial and protective of their communities. Males and sometimes females or juveniles, are known to go on ‘patrols’ of their borders to ensure other chimpanzees males and sometimes even females, do not enter. When such groups encounter other individuals, fighting regularly leading to death can occur. These patrols may benefit a community by extending boundaries, protecting members and incorporating females.

Chimpanzees co-exist with many other species of animals, including other primates such gorillas, baboons and several monkey species. However, they rely generally on different key food items, and mutually avoid contact. Interactions with other animals can vary in their response. Species such as large antelopes are regularly ignored. Other animals, which are potential predators such as leopards are feared and generally avoided. A few species can be seen as potential food sources, such as colobus monkeys and may be actively hunted if the opportunity arises. Chimpanzees have even been noted to capture and toy with species such as squirrels and tree hyraxes, but neither being regarded as prey animals. However, on the rare occasion is has been seen that chimpanzees may socially interact with other species. At Gombe, one young chimpanzee was found to play with a young baboon. Such interactions are only likely to develop in juveniles and not continue into adulthood.

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