History of the Jane Goodall Institute

Dr. Jane Goodall in Gombe National Park, Tanzania GANT clothing campaign

Dr. Jane Goodall in Gombe National Park, Tanzania

The Jane Goodall Institute for Wildlife Research, Education and Conservation was founded in California in 1977 by Jane Goodall and Princess Genevievedi San Faustino. Initially, JGI’s day to day operations were handled by board members and other volunteers working out of their homes. In the early 1980s, JGI moved to its San Francisco office at the California Academy of Sciences, where it functioned as a USA/Africa “communication link” and as an international resource for information regarding chimpanzees, their study, their behavior and their conservation. As JGI expanded and locations developed in over 25 countries worldwide, Jane Goodall Institute Global was formed to create a synergistic approach among its many offices. The JGI Family can now be found on every continent except Antarctica.

JGI in Uganda

In 1989 four chimpanzees, Sunday, Masiko, Jim and Megan, were confiscated by local Ugandan authorities and brought to Entebbe Zoo. In September 1990, these four chimpanzees were sent to Moscow to become local zoo residents but, in fact, ended up in the hands of an animal dealer.
Upon discovering this abuse and deception the Jane Goodall Institute UK, with the help of the International Primate Protection League, located the chimpanzees in Hungary where they were once again confiscated and flown back to Uganda.
The Jane Goodall Institute was asked to send a chimpanzee expert to accompany the chimps and remain in Uganda to support and train Ugandan personnel in their care and overall conservation.
This was the start of what is now the Jane Goodall Institute-Uganda, recognized worldwide as one of the foremost experts in chimpanzee education and conservation programs. Masiko, Sunday,  Megan and Jim were eventually released on Isinga Island Sanctuary near Entebbe on Lake Victoria and moved to their current home, CSWCT’s Ngamba Island Chimpanzee Sanctuary, in 1998.

Mambou in trees at TCRC in February 2015

Mambou in trees at TCRC in February 2015

 

 

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